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RE

Teaching RE at Eastwood Village Primary School

Progression in language, vocabulary and key ideas: a summary of a select shortlist of keywords and core concepts. This table shows how learning across the age groups develops and uses the language of religious study and of particular religions in increasing depth and complexity. There is an online glossary for each religion to accompany this summary page. The selected terminology is a brief suggested minimum that might feature in the planning of RE and can contribute to coherent progression. Do your pupils know and use this many religious words at the appropriate age? This approach is informed by OFSTED’s interest in ambitious curriculum, rich knowledge, sequencing and progression in thinking and substantive knowledge.

Reception Curiosity+ experience 5-7s: Exploring and discovering 7-9s: Knowing and understanding (adding to 4-7 lists) 9-11s

Understanding and connecting

11-14s: Applying, interpreting, appreciating and appraising

(adding to KS2 lists)

 

The general language of   religious study

Religion Special books Special places Special stories Prayer Religion, celebration, festival, symbol, thankful, faith, belief, wise sayings, rules for living, co- operation, belonging, worship, holiness, sacred. creation story. Religion, spiritual, commitment, values, prayer, pilgrim, pilgrimage, ritual, symbol, community, worship, devotion, belief, life after death, destiny, soul, inspiration, role-model Religion, harmony, respect, justice, faith, inter-faith, tolerance, moral values, religious plurality, moral codes, holiness, spiritual, inspiration, vision, symbol, community, commitment, values, sources of wisdom, spiritual, Golden Rule, charity, place of worship, sacred text, devotion, prayer,

worship, compassion.

Religion, beliefs, teachings, sources of authority, religious expression, ways of living, religious identity, diversity and controversy, psychology, sociology and philosophy of religion, ethics, community cohesion, religious conservatism, liberalism and radicalism.
 

 

Christianity

Christmas Easter Bible Church Jesus Christian, God, Creator, Christmas, Easter, Jesus, church, altar, font, Bible, gospel, Holy Spirit, baptism, Christening Christian, Christmas, Easter, Pentecost, Harvest Festival, Messiah, liturgy, church, Gospel, Jesus, Holy Spirit God the Creator, Trinity, Heaven Christian, Jesus, Bible, Creation and Fall, Gospel, Letters of Saint Paul, Trinity, Incarnation, Holy Spirit, resurrection, Christmas, Holy Week, Easter, Pentecost, Eucharist, agape, advent, disciple, Biblical authority and inspiration, intelligent design, theology, Christian ethics, ‘Just war’, sanctity of life, ‘green Christianity’, Catholic, Protestant, Anglican, Free Church, ecumenism, creed, liturgy, reconciliation,

Virgin Birth, prophecy.

 

 

Judaism

Moses Passover Torah Synagogue Star of David Jewish, synagogue, Torah, bimah, Hanukkah, Ark, Judaism, shabbat, Joseph. Jewish, Judaism, Abraham and Sarah, Moses, Exodus, Law-giver, Ten Commandments, Passover / Pesach, Day of Atonement. Judaism, Jewish, Torah, Shabbat, Pesach, Hanukkah, Ten Commandments, persecution, prejudice, Beth Shalom, remembrance, patriarch, Jacob, Ruth, King David, King Solomon, Esther, Purim,

Prophet, Isaiah, Daniel.

Tenakh, Mishnah, midrash, Havdalah, Chuppah, Kabbalah, Messiah, Noachide Laws, Yom Hashoah, Yom Kippur, Zionism, liberal, reform, Orthodox, Shema, shofar, shul.
 

 

Islam

Allah, Prophet Muhammad, Qur’an, Mosque Muslim, Islam, Allah, Prophet, mosque, Eid, Qur’an, moon and star. Muslim, Islam, Allah, Prophet, mosque, Qur’an, moon and star, paradise. Muslim, Allah, Prophethood, Ummah, 5 Pillars, Prophet Muhammad, Iman (faith), akhlaq (character or moral conduct) Qur’an, Hadith, Sunnah, Mosque, Hajj, al-fatihah,

adhan,

Last Prophet, Revelation, Shahadah, Sawm, Zakat, Ramadan, Hajj, submission to Allah, Sunni, Shi’a, Sufi, 99 Beautiful Names, Bismillah, Hijrah, Hafiz, Ihram, Shirk, Sunnah,

surah, tawhid

 

Hindu Dharma

Hindu, mandir, divali, Aum Murtis, gods and goddesses, puja, home shrine, devotion. Ganesha Hindu dharma, Sanatan Dharma, Rama, Sita, Hanuman, holi, Raksha

bandhan

Ahimsa, karma, dharma, Brahman, mandir, trimurti, gods such as Brahma, Shiva, Vishnu, goddesses such as Durga, Ambaji,

Shakti reincarnation, aarti, devotee,

Bhagavad Gita, atman, karma, dharma, moksha, ashram, ahimsa, yoga, Mahabharata, mandala, maya, varna, jati.
 

Sikhi

Sikh, Guru Nanak,

Gurdwara, Guru Granth Sahib

Sikhi, Langar, 10 Gurus, Vaisakhi, The 5 Ks, the Khalsa, Kaur

and Singh, Guru Govind Singh, Panj Piara

Waheguru, Harimandir Sahib, Amrit, Panj

Kakke, Kirpan, Kacchera, Kanga, Kara, Kesh Khanda, Sangat, Karah Prasad.

Nam Simran, Vand Chakna, Sewa, Gurmukh,

Hukam, Haumai, Ik Onkar, Rehat Maryada, Mul Mantar, Amritdhari.

 

Buddhism

Buddha, shrine, temple (vihara) Buddha, Dharma, Sangha,

Wesak, Siddhartha Gautama,

Meditation, Buddha, Dharma,

Sangha, the Four Sights, Enlightenment

Meditation, Kathina, The Four Noble Truths, Boddhisatva Enlightenment, Dukkha, Karuna, Noble

Eightfold Path, Nirvana, Mahayana, Theravada, Vajrayana, Zen, Triratna.

Non- religious worldviews Non-religious Humanist, Golden Rule, non-religious, worldview. Humanist, Golden Rule, non- religious, spiritual but not religious, atheist, ethics Atheist, agnostic, Humanist, rationalist, Golden Rule, ‘spiritual but not religious’, secular, rationalist. Varieties of atheism, ‘new atheists’,

skepticism, ethical autonomy, situation ethics, secular, secularist, pluralist atheists, anti- theists.

This suggested concept development plan for RE is a very basic tool; using the key words specified here might follow a plan where 3 religions are studied 5-7 and 4 each in KS2 and 3. Teachers do not have to teach all these words for all these religions. The lists are cumulative – begin on the left and move right. The key question here is not ‘do the pupils know the words?’ but ‘Can the pupils use the language and ideas of religions and religious study to explain their understanding?

Expectations, Progression and Achievement in Religious Education Good assessment practice

In RE, by the end of each key stage, pupils are expected to know, apply and understand the matters, skills and processes specified in the relevant program of study, as in all other subjects of the curriculum. The expectation is that pupils’ achievements will be weighed up by teachers using criteria arising from the programs of study. This statement is also included in the programs of study for each subject of the National Curriculum.

Schools have, in this Agreed Syllabus, a curriculum and assessment framework that meets the set of core principles offered by the DfE. Subject leaders for RE should also plan particular ways of describing achievement and progress for all pupils, using the outcomes specified for RE in this syllabus.

The core principles are that assessment should:

  • set out steps so that pupils reach or exceed the end of key stage expectations in the new RE curriculum;
  • enable teachers to measure whether pupils are on track to meet end of key stage expectations;
  • enable teachers to pinpoint the aspects of the curriculum in which pupils are falling behind, and recognise exceptional performance;
  • support teachers’ planning for all pupils; and
  • enable the teacher to report regularly to parents and, where pupils move to other schools, providing clear information about each pupils strengths, weaknesses and progress towards the end of key stage

In the light of these DfE principles as they relate to RE, the Agreed Syllabus offers answers to 5 key questions, addressed in the coming pages. The ‘Eight Steps Up’ approach to assessment here has continuities with the previous Level Scales, but is simpler, briefer and less prescriptive.

My View of the Journey of Life by Rhiarna (13)

This picture is featuring two paths of life that everyone walks. It is depicting the Christian world view of the journey of life. The two paths represent two major choices; life and death

I portrayed a burning city which is dark and threatening.

In contrast to the path of sin is the path of righteousness. This path and gate are narrow

I have drawn the path winding instead of straight because it often is not an easy path to follow Christ, sometimes there is persecution and hatred of the followers of Jesus. “Blessed are those who have been persecuted for the sake of righteousness, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven” Matthew 5:10

The cross in this picture represents the lifestyle that embraces the cross of Jesus Christ and all of its meaning.

There are praying hands, as the believer communicates to God in this way.

I have drawn the grass bright as the Bible talks about lying down in green pastures (Psalm 23). It also represents peace. However the focal point is the mansion which represents heaven. Most people are unaware that they have this choice to make, now you know, what choice will you make?

Question 1: What steps within an assessment framework enable pupils to reach or exceed the end of key stage expectations in the RE curriculum? What assessment methods are needed?

  • In RE, at 7, 11 and 14, pupils should show that they know, apply and understand the matters, skills and processes specified in the program of study. They should be adding to their rich knowledge of religions and worldviews through a clear sequence of learning in each unit of RE work.
  • Achievement is demonstrated by the whole of the learning experience, not just in writing, but also in discussion, dialogue, debate and other At the same time, many pupils show their best achievement in their best writing: RE must make space for this.

Rich knowledge: Concepts to be understood

  • The program of study enables pupils to increase and deepen their knowledge and understanding of key concepts in These concepts relate to the religions and world views studied. The areas of enquiry or key general concepts in RE can be described like this:
    • beliefs, teachings, sources of wisdom and authority;
    • experiences and ways of living;
    • ways of expressing meaning;
    • questions of identity, diversity and belonging;
    • questions of meaning, purpose and truth;
    • questions of values and

While this list of concepts bears a close relation to previous versions of RE curriculum guidance (e.g. the QCA National Non Statutory RE Framework of 2004, the 2013 RE Council Framework, the Rotherham RE Syllabus of 2015), the concepts are listed above to provide a checklist of areas in which pupils will make progress in RE and to guide syllabus makers in developing appropriate statements of attainment for different groups of pupils. This task will require further work and consultation in the RE community.

Rich knowledge: Gaining and deploying skills

The program of study also identifies progression in skills across the 5-14 age range. In relation to the religions and world views they study, pupils are increasingly enabled to develop both their knowledge and understanding and their expression and communication through the skills which they gain and deploy.

While the program of study makes clear the skills which are expected of learners at the end of each key stage, progress towards these outcomes will need careful planning in programs of study.

The progression in understanding and skills that the programs of study envisage are made explicit in the three summary pyramid diagrams on the next page6. These are presented for syllabus users to consider as they approach for themselves the tasks of describing progression in RE and designing instruments that will enable fair, valid and manageable assessment for learning in RE. The pyramids relate closely to the three areas of aims for RE which this curriculum framework provides.

It is often good practice to look for pupils’ work to demonstrate the outcomes first in an emerging form, second by meeting the expectations, and then third by exceeding expectations. Teachers may find it helpful to express this as ‘emerging understanding, secure understanding, developed understanding’ as pupils move towards the outcomes. Time is needed for pupils to consolidate and embed their learning before moving to the next steps.

Suggested progression steps in RE for 5-14s (skills)

Specifically pupils should be taught to:

Know about and understand religions and world views Express ideas and insights into religions and world views Gain and deploy the skills for learning from religions and world views
A1. Recall and name different beliefs and practices, including festivals, worship, rituals and

ways of life, in order to find out about the meanings behind them.

B1. Ask and respond to questions about what communities do, and why, so that they can identify what difference belonging to a community might make. C1. Explore questions about belonging, meaning and truth so that they can express their own ideas and opinions in response using words, music, art or poetry.
A2. Retell and suggest meanings to some religious and moral stories, exploring and discussing sacred writings and sources of wisdom and recognising the communities from which they come. B2. Observe and recount different ways of expressing identity and belonging, responding sensitively for themselves. C2. Find out about and respond with ideas to examples of co-operation between people who are different.
A3. Recognise some different symbols and actions which express a community’s way of life, appreciating some similarities between communities. B3. Notice and respond sensitively to some similarities between different religions and world views. C3. Find out about questions of right and wrong and begin to express their ideas and opinions in response.

 

The breadth of study in RE

During the key stage, pupils should be taught the Knowledge, skills and understanding through the following areas of study: The Themes of Key Stage 1 RE

▪  believing: what people believe about God, humanity and the natural world;

▪  story: how and why some stories are sacred and important in religion;

▪  celebrations: how and why celebrations are important in religion;

▪  symbols: how and why symbols express religious meaning;

▪  leaders and teachers: figures who have an influence on others locally, nationally and globally in religion;

▪  belonging: where and how people belong and why belonging is important;

▪  myself: who I am and my uniqueness as a person in a family and community.

Experiences and opportunities for Key Stage 1 pupils:

▪  visiting places of worship and focusing on symbols and feelings;

▪  listening and responding to visitors from local faith communities;

▪  using their senses and having times of quiet reflection;

▪  using art and design, music, dance and drama to develop their creative talents and imagination;

▪  sharing their own beliefs, ideas and values and talking about their feelings and experiences;

▪  beginning to use ICT to explore religions and beliefs as practised in the local and wider community, for example through a ‘virtual tour’ of the sacred places of religions studied.

 

1.1:  Who am I? Myself and my communities

1.2:  How do Christians celebrate Christmas?

1.3:  What festivals do Jewish people like to celebrate?

1.4:  Find out: what happens in Churches and Synagogues?

1.5:  What can we learn from stories about Moses?

1.6:  What can we learn from stories of Jesus?

[1.7: Beginning to learn about Islam (for schools that choose a study of Islam instead of Judaism, this unit provides 12 additional lessons of work, for use in Year 1 or 2)]

 

2.1:  What are the ‘signs of belonging’ for Christians and Jewish people?

2.2:  How do we say ‘thank you’ for a beautiful world? Christians, creation and thanksgiving

2.3:  Questions about God

2.4:  Being fair, showing care: what can we learn from religious stories?

2.5:  What do the symbols of the Easter festival mean?

2.6:  Leaders: who needs them? Learning from Jews and Christians

The investigation plans provided for 5-7 year olds are:

1.1: Who am I? Myself and my communities 1.2: How do Christians celebrate Christmas?

1.3: What festivals do Jewish people like to celebrate? 1.4: Find out: what happens in Churches and Synagogues? 1.5: What can we learn from stories about Moses?

1.6: What can we learn from stories of Jesus?

[1.7: Beginning to learn about Islam (for schools that choose a study of Islam instead of Judaism, this unit provides 12 additional lessons of work, for use in Year 1 or 2)]
  • : What are the ‘signs of belonging’ for Christians and Jewish people?
  • : How do we say ‘thank you’ for a beautiful world? Christians, creation and thanksgiving.
  •  : Questions about God
  • : Being fair, showing care: what can we learn from religious stories? 2.5: What do the symbols of the Easter festival mean?

2.6: Leaders: who needs them? Learning from Jews and Christians

The scheme of work is flexible. Teachers are encouraged to use these plans flexibly, adapting them to pupils learning needs and to different age groups as appropriate. They are not prescriptive, and other plans devised by the school are always an alternative as long as they enable pupils to meet the outcomes of the syllabus. The plans can be used in a different order which the school chooses, though the first six are better adapted to Year 1 RE and the sequence of the exemplary plans is a sound basis for planned progress through the key stage.

Program of Study for 5-7s

These investigations can be used in the order given above, which enables progression in learning, but schools are free to rearrange them if they wish, e.g. to accommodate the learning needs of mixed age classes.

Some examples of detailed planning for these units of work are available on the Agreed Syllabus Support website.

Year 1-2 RE Programmes of Study

Unit 1.1 Who am I? Myself and my communities

Intentions: What do we

want pupils to learn?

Implementation: what kind of activities will enable learners to gain knowledge and to achieve? Impact: what outcomes will

pupils achieve?

Knowledge

Pupils will learn about sev- eral different religious festi- vals and acquire new reli- gious vocabulary. They will develop understanding of Jewish and Christian reli- gions as identities held dear by some people, and learn about related symbols, in- cluding welcoming a new baby.

 

Questions

How do we show respect for one another?

How do we show love/how do I know I am loved?

Who do you care about? How do we show care / how do I know I am cared for?

How do you know what people are feeling?

How do we show people they are welcome?

What things can we do bet- ter together rather than on our own?

Where do you belong? How do you know you be- long?

What feels special about be- ing welcomed into a group

of people?

One way of introducing this question is to ask a new mum to bring a baby into the class and talk about how the baby was welcomed into their family.

·         Talk about the idea that each person is unique and valuable. Talk about occasions when things have happened in their lives that made them feel special, from everyday events (a hug from Mum/Dad/carer/friend) and special events (a birthday).

·         Talk with the children about ‘who we are’ in terms of the things we get from our families. Boy or girl? First child or later in the family? Talk about our different skin colours, hair colours and eye col- ours, and our ethnicities. Talk about the different religions children have heard of. Does anyone know who celebrate Diwali? Eid? Christmas? Explain that some people have a religious identity, but others are non-religious. We can all share one school – and one world!

·         Introduce the idea that religions teach that each person is unique and valuable too, for example by considering religious beliefs about God loving each person. Explore the Jewish and Christian ideas that God loves people even from before they are born (Psalm 139), and their names are written on the palm of God’s hand (Isaiah 49:16). Children could draw around their hands, write their names on the palm and decorate. Also reflect on Christian beliefs about Jesus believing children to be very special. Tell the story of Jesus wanting to see the children even though the disciples tried stopping them (Mark 10:13–16). Who do we know who makes children feel special?

·         Explain how this belief that God loves children is shown in Christianity through infant baptism and dedication. People from other communities have different ways of welcoming new babies.

·         Consider signs and symbols used in the welcoming of children into the faith community, e.g. water (pure and clean) and a baptismal candle. Look at photos; handle artefacts (robes, cards, etc.); use role play.

·         Additional diversity work: You could also talk about how children are welcomed into another faith or belief community, e.g. the Islamic Aqiqah ceremony, whispering of adhan and cutting of hair; com- pare how non-religious families welcome new babies, e.g. some atheists (people who believe there is no God) might hold a Humanist naming ceremony.

·         Consider ways of showing that people are special from other religions, e.g. stories about Hindus cel- ebrating Raksha Bandhan, which celebrates the special bond between brothers and sisters. A sister ties a band (called a rakhi) sometimes of gold and red threads around the right hand of her brother.

·         Celebrate the fact that we are all special. No fingerprints are the same, and neither are our identities, but we all share one classroom – and one world. Can you do a song and dance about this?

·         A2: re-tell religious sto- ries making connections with personal experiences

·         A3: recognise what hap- pens at a traditional Christian infant baptism and dedication

·         B2: observe and recount what happens when a baby is welcomed into a religion (other than Chris- tianity)

·         C3: Find out more about belonging by asking questions and hearing an- swers, so that they can share and record occa- sions when things have happened in their lives that made them feel spe- cial

 

Key question 1.2: How do Christians celebrate Christmas? (Incarnation)

Intentions: What do we

want pupils to learn?

Implementation: what kind of activities will enable learners to gain knowledge and to achieve? Impact: what outcomes will

pupils achieve?

Knowledge

Pupils will learn detailed factual information about the stories of Christmas sand the celebrations to- day, gaining new vocabu- lary. They will discover and remember what symbols of Christmas point towards. They will find out how the bible tells the stories of Je- sus and connect these sto- ries to celebrations and songs, music and carols.

 

Questions

What makes some days special for different peo- ple?

Who enjoys Christmas – is it for everyone – not just Christian people?

What stories about Jesus matter to Christians at Christmas and why?

What stories can be told in songs, drama, film, or by a storyteller that show the values of Christmas?

What are the values of Christmas? Generosity, care, love, devotion to God, family?

Introduce this unit by looking for signs that Christmas is coming – signs of winter, decorations, adverts.

Ask pupils why they think Christmas is important for Christians.

·         Tell some familiar stories about a character who appears to be someone he/she is not (e.g. in Beauty and the Beast). Look at a picture of baby Jesus from the Christian tradition. What can pupils tell about him from the picture? Most Christians believe he was very special – not an ordinary baby, but God on Earth! Note that the word ‘incarnation’ means ‘God in the flesh’. Christmas celebrates the in- carnation.

·         Talk about getting a bedroom ready for a new baby. What would families do to prepare? Imagine the new baby is ‘God come to Earth’ – what kind of room do the pupils expect would be suitable for this baby? Who might come and visit?

·         Tell the story of the Nativity from the Gospel of Luke, chapters 1 and 2. You could use a Christmas story trail (e.g. Experience Christmas from Jumping Fish). Set up some stations: Gabriel visits Mary, the journey to Bethlehem, Jesus is born and placed in a manger, angels appear to shepherds, shep- herds visit Mary. Pupils hear the story at each station then go back to their places and draw pic- tures/write sentences to retell it. Of course, many schools dramatise the Nativity story in Christmas plays. Use this practice for learning too.

·         Talk about Jesus’ birth in the outhouse/stable – what were conditions like, and who visited? Luke’s story talks about Jesus’ birth being ‘good news’. Talk about who it might be good news for and why, and why Christmas is important for Christians.

·         Look at a selection of Christmas cards: which ones have a clear link to the story in Luke? Ask pupils to explain the links. Either visit a church to find out what will be happening around Christmas, or get a local Christian leader to bring in photos. Find out about the colours the vicar/priest might wear. What other signs will there be about Jesus’ birthday and that this is important to Christians? Intro- duce the word ‘advent’, which is when Christians prepare for Jesus’ arrival. Find out about some Ad- vent traditions (e.g. Advent wreath, candle, calendar; making a crib scene; etc.).

·         Make connections with the kinds of decorations people put up for birthdays or for Diwali with those put up by Christians for Jesus’ birthday. What decorations would connect with the story in Luke? Which ones are not connected to the Bible, but to other secular (non-religious) Christmas traditions? Are there themes, such as light, which can be found in different celebrations?

·         People give gifts and say ‘thank you’ at Christmas. Ask pupils to create the ’thank you’ prayers of all the characters in the Nativity story in Luke. Think about all the people pupils would like to thank at Christmas time. Ask pupils to create some of their own ‘thank you’ statements and give them out.

Note: This unit focuses on Luke’s Gospel, so that if your school does Christmas in each year group, the other class(es) could use Matthew’s account (chapters 1 and 2), including the wise men and gifts, Christ- mas carols linking to giving and incarnation and ways in which people help and support others at Christ- mas.

Teachers will enable pupils to achieve these outcomes, as appropriate to their age

and stage, so that they can:

 

Make sense of belief

·         recognise that stories of Jesus’ life come from the Gospels

·         give a clear, simple ac- count of the story of Jesus’ birth and why Jesus is important for Christians

Understand the impact

·         give examples of ways in which Christians use the story of the Nativity to guide their beliefs and actions at Christ- mas

·         ask questions about the values in the sto- ries of Christmas and suggest answers

Make connections

·         think, talk and ask questions about Christ- mas for people who are Christians and for people who are not

·         decide what they per- sonally have to be thankful for, giving a reason for their ideas

 

Unit 1.3 What festivals do Jewish people like to celebrate?

Intentions: What do we

want pupils to learn?

Implementation: what kind of activities will enable learners to gain knowledge and to achieve? Impact: what outcomes will

pupils achieve?

Knowledge:

Pupils will learn simply about annual or weekly celebrations for Jewish people, including Pesach, Hanukkah and Shabbat. They will learn about the songs, worship, celebra- tions, stories, artefacts and food. Festivals from other faiths can be intro- duced e.g. Diwali, Eid al Fitr.

 

Skills:

Pupils will practice the skills of suggesting a meaning in an artefact, symbol or religious prac- tice.

 

Key concepts and words Celebration, festival, reli- gion, Jewish, Hanukkah, Pesach, Shabbat, syna- gogue, Torah.

Pupils:

·         explore and talk about stories and celebrations of, for example, Hanukkah, Pesach, finding out about what the stories told at the festivals mean, e.g. through hearing stories, talking about ‘big days’, learning from festive food, enacting celebrations, learning from artefacts or welcoming visitors to talk about their festivals (A1);

·         select examples of religious artefacts from Judaism that interest them, and name these, raising lists of questions about them and finding out what they mean and how they are used in festivals and for example in prayer and worship at the synagogue and in a Jewish home (A3);

·         find out about what different religions and world views do to celebrate the fruitfulness of the earth (e.g. in Harvest Festivals). They respond to questions about being generous and being thankful (B1);

·         notice and talk about the fact that people come from different religions. Think and talk about these questions: How can we tell? How can we live together kindly when we are all so different? (C2).

·         remember the names of the artefacts, religions and stories they have learned

·         write or retell (e.g. by sequencing) a simple version of the stories they have learned as ap- propriate to their age group. BBC Teach’s stories ‘Religions of the World’ for 4-7s are a good source. Hanukkah and Pesach are shown in these programmes.

Most pupils will be able to:

·         Recall and name reli- gious festivals, objects and symbols

·         Retell a story that lies behind a festival

·         Suggest a meaning for an object used in the worship of the festival

·         Ask questions about the meaning of the fes- tival and listen to an- swers

·         Respond to some of the experiences and emotions of festivals:

e.g. joy, memory, com- munity, faith, sensing God’s presence.

·         Express an idea of their own about why festi- vals and celebrations matter

·         Give an example of a big day in their own

lives and talk about what made it special

Specifically, pupils should be taught to:

Know about and understand religions and world views Express ideas and insights into the significance of religion and world views Gain and deploy skills for engaging with religions and world views
A1. Describe and make connections between different features of the religions and world views they study, discovering more about celebrations, worship, pilgrimages and the rituals which mark important points in life in order to reflect thoughtfully on their ideas. B1. Observe and understand varied examples of religions and world views so that they can explain, with reasons, their meanings and significance to individuals and communities. C1. Discuss and present thoughtfully their own and others’ views on challenging questions about belonging, meaning, purpose and truth, applying ideas of their own thoughtfully in different forms including (e.g.) reasoning, music, art and poetry.
A2. Describe and understand links between stories and other aspects of the communities they are investigating, responding thoughtfully to a range of sources of wisdom and to beliefs and teachings that arise from them in different communities. B2. Understand the challenges of commitment to a community

of faith or belief, suggesting why belonging to a community may be valuable, both in the diverse communities being studied and in their own lives.

C2. Consider and apply ideas about ways in which diverse communities can live together for the well being of all, responding thoughtfully to ideas about community, values and respect.
A3. Explore and describe a range of beliefs, symbols and actions so that they can understand different ways of life and ways of expressing meaning. B3. Observe and consider different dimensions of religion, so that they can explore and show understanding of similarities and differences between different religions and world views. C3. Discuss and apply their own and others’ ideas about ethical questions, including ideas about what is right and wrong and what is just and fair, and express their own ideas clearly in response.

Pupils will achieve the outcomes by learning from at least three religions, studying Christianity in each year group and also Islam and Hinduism. They will study examples of non-religious worldviews alongside religions. Schools may choose to go beyond this minimum coverage of religions if they wish.

Breadth of study

During key stage 2 pupils should be taught the knowledge, skills and understanding through the following areas of study:

 

 

Experiences and opportunities

•       encountering religion through visitors and visits to places of worship, virtual visits using ICT and focusing on the impact and reality of religion on the local and global community;

•       discussing religious and philosophical questions, giving reasons for their own beliefs and those of others;

•       considering a range of human experiences and feelings;

•       reflecting on their own and others’ insights into life and its origin, purpose and meaning;

•       expressing and communicating their own and others’ insights through art and design, music, dance, drama and ICT;

•       developing the use of ICT for RE, particularly in enhancing pupils’ awareness of religions and beliefs globally.

The Themes of Key Stage 2 RE

•       beliefs and questions: how people’s beliefs about God, the world and others impact on their lives;

•       teachings and authority: what sacred texts and other sources say about God, the world and human life;

•       worship, pilgrimage and sacred places: where, how and why people worship, including at particular sites;

•       the journey of life and death: why some occasions are sacred to believers, and what people think about life after death;

•       symbols and religious expression: how religious and spiritual ideas are expressed;

•       inspirational people: figures from whom believers find inspiration;

•       religion and the individual: what is expected of a person in following a religion or belief;

•       religion, family and community: how religious families and communities practise their faith, and the contributions this makes to local life;

•       beliefs in action in the world: how religions and beliefs respond to global issues of human rights, fairness, social justice and the importance of the environment.

Guidance and planning will be greatly helped where teachers refer to the syllabus support materials from SACRE, which include a complete planned scheme of work for this key stage. For each year group, we have provided three plans, which can be taught over the course of a term. Schools which choose to do a fourth, school-based unit plan may deliver those provided in 10 hours of tuition whereas schools using three units per year will probably allow 12-14+ hours of teaching time per unit.

 

The investigation plans provided for 7-11s are:

3.1: What makes Jesus inspirational for some people?

3.2: What is it like to be a Hindu?

3.3: Christian Worship: How and why do some people find peace and strength by belonging to a Church?

 

4.1: What is God like? What matters most in life? What happens when we die? Christian and Hindu answers to questions on life’s journey.

4.2: Values: what matters most to Christians and Humanists?

4.3: Worship, pilgrimage, belonging + community: what matters to Hindus and Christians?

 

5.1: How do Christians use the Bible?

5.2: How do Muslims practice the 5 Pillars of Islam?

5.3: Why are there now over 200 mosques in Yorkshire?

 

6.1: Christian Aid and Islamic Relief: can they change the world?

6.2: Who is inspiring to Muslims and to Christians?

6.3: What will make Rotherham a more respectful place?

 

Teachers are encouraged to use these plans flexibly, adapting them to pupils learning needs and to different age groups as appropriate. They are not prescriptive, and other plans devised by the school are always an alternative as long as they enable pupils to meet the outcomes of the syllabus. Schools can use these plans in carefully sequenced order provided here to enable steady progress in RE, but if they choose to teach in a different order then planning a sequenced curriculum for progression is still a priority.

Year 3

Intentions: What do we want

pupils to learn?

Implementation: what kind of activities will enable learners to achieve? Impact: what outcomes will

pupils achieve?

Year 3

 

Unit Number 3.1

Theme: inspirational people

 

Enquiry Question What makes Jesus inspirational for some people?

 

Religion: Christianity

Knowledge:

Pupils will learn that Jesus, the key figure of Christianity, is known from 4 Gospels, and they will be able to recall and describe details of numerous stories from his life, including miracles, parables, the stories of Holy Week and Easter.

They will know that Christians offer many different reasons for finding him inspirational, including theological reasons. Skills:

Discussion, gathering information from video, story, visual resources and where possible interviews or visits, inferring and suggesting meanings to religious practices.

 

Key concepts and words Religion, spiritual, commitment, values, prayer, worship, devotion, belief, inspiration.

Christian, Christmas, Easter, Pentecost, Harvest Festival, Messiah, liturgy, church, Gospel, Jesus, Holy Spirit God the Creator, Trinity, Heaven

§  Briefly explore what makes a person inspirational to others, identifying characteristics of a good role model.

§  Explore creatively some words and actions of Jesus which continue to inspire Christians today e.g parables of the kingdom of heaven (Matthew 13:1–45; sower, mustard seed, pearl etc.); parables of forgiveness (good Samaritan, Luke 10:29–37; two debtors, Luke 7:36–50; unforgiving servant, Matthew 18:21–35); hot-seat characters, freeze-frame or act out stories; create artworks; collect pupils’ questions, then find out how Christians interpret these by asking some.

§  Use the events of Holy Week and Easter to find out why Jesus is so important to Christians today; how are the events of Holy Week celebrated by Christians, e.g. Palm Sunday, waving palms; Maundy Thursday, washing feet; sorrow of Good Friday services; darkness in churches on Saturday; light and joy of Easter Day.

§  Explore the question: why do Christians call Good Friday ‘good’? Include the terms incarnation (Jesus as God as a human being) and salvation (Christians believe that Jesus’ death and resurrection opens up a way for people to be forgiven and get close to God) (see Unit L2.2 for more on these terms).

§  Find out about the impact that believing in Jesus can have on a Christian’s life and how Jesus has inspired some examples of contemporary inspirational Christians, e.g. how Christians show gratitude to Jesus for saving them and dealing with sin and death and bringing forgiveness – by prayer, worship, giving generously, telling other people about Jesus, caring for others.

§  Introduce the belief that Christians cannot be completely good and so they rely on the Holy Spirit to help them follow Jesus and be more like him (see the ‘fruit of the Spirit, Galatians 5:22–23).

§  Follow this up with examples of what some Christians say are the most important attitudes and values to have, as inspired by Jesus’ teachings and actions (e.g. love, fairness, service, sacrifice, joy) comparing these with what pupils believe to be most important.

§  A2. Describe and understand links between stories and other aspects of Christian belief about Jesus, responding thoughtfully to Bible texts;

§  A3. Explore and describe a range of beliefs, symbols and actions connected to the life of Jesus so that they can understand Christian ways of expressing meaning.

§  B1. Observe and understand how Christians worship God in Jesus so that they can explain, with reasons, why He is an inspiration to millions;

§  B2 Understand the challenges of commitment to Jesus for Christians, suggesting why belonging to the Christian community may be valuable;

§  C1. Discuss and present thoughtfully their own and others’ views on challenging questions about inspiration and about Jesus’ teaching and example;

§  C3. Discuss and apply their own and others’ ideas about what is just and fair from Jesus’ life story, and express their own ideas clearly in

response.

Intentions: What do we want

pupils to learn?

Implementation: what kind of activities will enable learners to

achieve?

Impact: what outcomes will

pupils achieve?

Year 3

 

Unit Number 3.2 Theme

Religion, family, community, worship, celebration, ways of living

 

Enquiry Question What is it like to be a Hindu?

 

How do Hindu families practise their faith?

What are the deeper meanings of some Hindu festivals?

 

Religion: Hinduism

Knowledge:

§  Pupils will gain knowledge about Hindu worship and celebration, including details information about stories of Rama and Sita, celebrations of Divali and at least one other Hindu festival in both India and in the UK,

§  They will explore Hindu ideas about gods and goddesses, worship in the home and Mandir, beliefs and values expressed in stories, festivities and worship and learning from Hindu community life.

Skills:

Discussion, gathering information from video, story, visual resources and where possible interviews or visits, inferring and suggesting meanings to religious practices.

Key concepts and words Religion, Hindu, murtis, gods and goddesses, karma, dharma, spiritual, festivals, ritual, symbol (including the Aum symbol),

community, commitment, values.

Pupils:

§ pursue an enquiry into Hindu worship, festivals and celebrations, developing ideas of their own on the deeper meanings of festivals through asking questions, looking at evidence from video, photography, text and participants’ descriptions, including a visit or an interview with a visitor where possible (BBC ‘My Life My Religion: Hindus’ has good clips for this unit) (A1)

§ find out about the meanings of stories, symbols and actions used in Hindu worship and celebrations at home and in the mandir, learning about murtis, images of the gods and goddesses and the beliefs about the ultimate reality they express, including concepts of karma, dharma and Brahman (A3)

§ describe and understand links between Hindu stories and celebrations, examining the Divali stories, for example, and at least one other festival, using different literacy approaches to the characters and meanings of the stories (A2)

§ investigate the deeper meanings of Hindu festivals and respond thoughtfully to them: themes of light and darkness, goodness and evil, honesty and trust, collaboration and co-operation, patience and devotion are to be explored in relation to the stories told at festivals and about the gods and goddesses (B1)

§ express and communicate their understanding about the meanings of the festivals, reflecting on and learning from these and making deepening connections to their own lives and celebrations, This could include non-religious festivals such as New Year or Comic Relief Day (C3)

§ write thoughtfully about their understanding of similarities and differences between the Hindu festivals and the things they celebrate on the ‘big days of the year’ – why do festivals from all religions often include such elements as old stories, charity, values, community gatherings, special foods, drinks and meals, shared music and dance, gifts, traditions, fireworks, processions?

Most pupils will be able to:

·         Describe Hindu beliefs about the gods and goddesses

·         Show that they understand what happens at Hindu worship in the home or the mandir

·         Respond with thoughtful ideas of their own to the ways Hindus celebrate

·         Express some ‘deeper meanings’ of the festivals they study, giving reasons why particular rituals are important to Hindus

·         Explain similarities and differences between two Hindu festivals

·         Explain similarities and differences between a ‘big day’ they celebrate and Hindu festivities

Intentions: What do we

want pupils to learn?

Implementation: what kind of activities will enable learners to achieve? Impact: what outcomes will

pupils achieve?

Year 3

 

Unit Number 3.3

Theme: Worship

 

Enquiry Question Christian Worship: How and why do some people find peace and strength by belonging to a Church?

Knowledge:

Pupils will learn that They will know that Christians offer many

different reasons for taking part in worship and the life of a Christian community, including theological reasons.

 

Skills:

Discussion, gathering information from video, story, visual resources and where possible interviews or visits, inferring and suggesting meanings to religious practices.

Teach pupils about Christian family life

§   Find out about how Christians show their faith within their families. What objects might you find in a Christian’s home and why? E.g. Bible, cross/crucifix, palm cross, pictures of Jesus or the holy family (Mary, Joseph and Jesus), Christian magazines, Christian music, some Bible verses on the fridge. What kinds of things would Christian families do during the week?

E.g. grace before meals, family prayers and Bible reading, private prayer and Bible reading, giving money to charity. Talk about which objects and actions are most important and why. What similarities and differences are there with the family values and home rituals of pupils in the class? BBC ‘My Life My Religion’ has 9 useful clips about British Christian children’s lives and beliefs: click the link ~ https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b05p6sp4

Teach pupils about Christian community life in Church

§   Explore what Christians do to show their faith within their church communities. What do they do together and why? Explore church noticeboards or websites to find out what goes on in at least two different kinds of churches (e.g. Anglican, Baptist, Roman Catholic, Pentecostal), and some of the similarities and differences between what Christians do there.

E.g. Sunday school classes, ‘Messy Church’, Girls Brigade, Boys’ Brigade, Sunday services, different types of worship music, home groups. Ask some teenagers from two churches about how they show their faith.

Christians life in the wider community

§   Find out what Christians do to show their faith in how they help their local community. Choose one or two local churches to illustrate local involvement, e.g. in food banks, running crèches and toddler groups, supporting those in need (e.g. St Vincent de Paul Society), running ‘Christians Against Poverty’ money management courses, Alpha Courses, cake sales, visiting the sick, etc. Obviously, Christians are not the only people who do these things, but find out why Christians and others do work hard to help people in their communities. What kinds of things do pupils at your school do to help others, and why?

§   Find out about some ways in which Christians make a difference in the worldwide community. How do they show that they are Christians? E.g.s from Christian leaders might include [Mother] Saint Teresa, Pope Francis, Archbishop Justin Welby. See if there are local Christians who are involved in working for justice etc.

§   Read a part of a chapter from the Bible and consider how and how far the Christians you found out about have put their scriptures into action. I

Corinthians 13:4-7 or Romans 12: 9-21 would be suitable.

§  A2. Describe and understand links between Christian beliefs and the life and practice of a local Church, responding thoughtfully to Bible texts;

§  A3. Explore and describe a range of beliefs, symbols and actions connected to Christian worship so that they can understand Christian ways of expressing meaning.

§  B1. Observe and understand how Christians worship God in the life of a church so that they can explain, with reasons, why the church can provide peace and strength I the community;

§  B2 Understand the challenges of commitment for Christians, suggesting why belonging to the Christian community may be valuable;

§  C1. Discuss and present thoughtfully their own and others’ views on challenging questions about how being part of a community can shape our lives;

§  C3. Discuss and apply their own and others’ ideas about community, togetherness and shared values, and express their own ideas clearly in response.

Religion: Christianity Key concepts and words Religion, spiritual, commitment, values, prayer, worship, devotion, belief, inspiration.

Christian, Church, fellowship, community, ‘the body of Christ’, liturgy, Gospel, Jesus, Holy Spirit, God the Creator.

Intentions: What do we want pupils to

learn?

Implementation: what kind of activities will enable learners to achieve? Impact: what outcomes will pupils achieve?
Year 4

Unit Number 4.1 Theme

Religion, worldviews, family and community:

 

Enquiry Questions What do different people – Hindus and Christians – believe about God, what matters and what happens when we die?

 

Religions: Christians, Hindus

Knowledge: Pupils will:

§  Learn about examples of Hindu and Christian belief to do with God, the purposes of our lives and what happens when we die, using some original scripture sayings and texts

§  be taught about at least two examples of the ways these beliefs make an impact in practice for Hindus and Christians

Skills:

They will think reasonably about questions of belief, community and sources of wisdom

Pupils:

·         Talk about ways in which we exercise trust and faith in our everyday lives.

·         Find some examples of how we know about something we have not seen or experienced for ourselves.

·         What do people believe about God? Explore some of the ways in which religions name and describe the attributes of God – with a particular focus on how Christians think of God as Trinity – Father, Son and Holy Spirit or Hindu beliefs about the Trimurti – Brahma (creator), Vishnu (preserver), Shiva (destroyer).

·         Study art (Christians), and/or murtis (Hindus) used to represent ideas about God to find out what they say about God.

·         Explore how ideas about God are shown in stories/narratives:

E.g. encounters which help believers to understand God’s relationship with people e.g., Moses and the Burning Bush (Exodus 3.1–15), Jonah (book of Jonah in the Old Testament); Baptism of Jesus (Mark 1.9–11); Pentecost (Acts 2. 1–21) and Paul’s conversion (Acts 9.1–19); stories Jesus told which teach about God e.g. the parable of the Lost Son (or the Forgiving Father) (Luke 15.11–32).

·         Hindu texts which describe the indescribable (e.g. extract some of the more concrete metaphors from Bhagavad Gita 7:8–9 and 10:21–41; [www.asitis.com/7/] or the poem ‘Who?’ by Sri Aurobindo).

·         Examine similarities and differences between these views of God.

·         Explore the influence believing in God has on the lives of believers – how it affects their personal worldviews.

·         Explore the fact that many people do not believe in God. Find out some reasons why, and consider what difference it can make to someone’s personal worldview.

·         Reflect on pupils’ own questions and ideas about God in light

of their learning.

·         Express their own ideas about God (whether or not they believe God is real) through art, music, poetry or drama.

Most pupils can:

·         Retell and suggest the meanings of stories from sacred texts about people who encountered God (A1).

·         Describe some of the ways in which Christians and Hindus describe God (A1).

·         Identify beliefs about God that are held by Christians and Hindus (B1).

·         Suggest why having a faith or belief in something can be hard (B2).

·         Identify how and say why it makes a difference in people’s lives to believe in God (B1).

·         Identify some similarities and differences between ideas about what God is like in different religions (B3).

·         Ask questions and suggest some of their own responses to ideas about God (C1).

·         Discuss and present their own ideas about why there are many ideas about God and express their own understanding of God through words, symbols and the arts (C1)

Key concepts and words
Belief, faith, devotion,
symbol, God, Trinity
Trimurti, murtis,
atheist, agnostic,
diversity.
Intentions: What do we

want pupils to learn?

Implementation: what kind of activities will enable learners to

achieve?

Impact: what outcomes will

pupils achieve?

Year 4

Unit Number 4.2 Theme

Religion, worldviews, beliefs, values and moral choices

 

Enquiry Questions What matters most to Christians and Humanists?

 

Religions / worldviews: Christians, Humanists

Knowledge:

§  Pupils will learn 5 simple facts about Humanists and about Christians

§  They will be taught about at least two examples of the values that these two groups share, and two distinctive values from each group.

Skills:

They will think reasonably about questions of beliefs, ethics, values in action and community.

Pupils:

·         Talk about what kinds of behaviour and actions pupils think of as bad (examples from films, books, TV as well as real life). Rank some of these ideas – which are the worst, and which are less bad? Why?

·         Reflect on the question: why do people do good things and bad things? Are we all a mixture of good and bad? Explore pupils’ answers. Make a link with traditional Christian belief about humans being made in the image of God (Genesis 1:28) and also sinful (the ‘Fall’ in Genesis 3). Why do many Christians think this is a good explanation of why humans are good and bad?

·         Talk about how having a ‘code for living’ might help people to be good. Talk about the difference if someone believes guidance comes from a divine Being (e.g. many Christians) or that human beings must decide their own guidelines (most non-religious).

·         Look at a Humanist, non-religious ‘code for living’, e.g. Be honest; Use your mind; Tell the truth; Do to other people what you would like them to do to you. How would this help people to behave? What would a Humanist class, school or town look like?

·         Explore the meanings of some big moral concepts, e.g. fairness, freedom, truth, honesty, kindness, peace. What do they look like in everyday life?

·         Christian codes for living can be summed up in Jesus’ two rules, love God and love your neighbour. Explore in detail how Jesus expects his followers to behave through the story of the good Samaritan (Luke 10:25–37) and Jesus’ attitude on the cross (Luke 23:32–35). Jesus talks about actions as fruit. What does he mean? If a person’s intentions are bad, can their actions produce good fruit?

·         Discuss what matters most, e.g. by ranking, sorting and ordering a list of ‘valuable things’: family / friends / Xbox / pets / God / food / being safe / being clever / being beautiful / being good / sport / music / worship / love / honesty / human beings. Get pupils to consider why they hold the values which they do, and how these values make a difference to their lives.

·         Consider some direct questions about values: is peace more valuable than money? Is love more important than freedom? Is thinking bad thoughts as bad as acting on them?

·         Notice and think about the fact that values can clash, and that doing the right thing can be difficult. How do pupils decide for themselves?

Most pupils can:

·         Identify the values found in stories and texts (A2).

·         Describe what Christians mean about humans being made in the image of God and being ‘fallen’, giving examples (A2).

·         Suggest ideas about why humans can be both good and bad, making links with Christian and Humanist ideas (B3).

·         Suggest reasons why it might be helpful to follow a moral code and why it might be difficult, offering different points of view (B2).

·         Describe some Christian and Humanist values (B3).

·         Give examples of similarities and differences between Christian and Humanist values (B3).

·         Apply ideas about what really matters in life for themselves, including ideas about fairness, freedom, truth, peace, in the light of their learning (C2).

·         Express their own ideas about some big moral concepts, such as fairness, honesty etc., comparing them with the ideas of others they have studied (C3).

Key concepts and words Atheist, Humanist, Agnostic, values, ethics, moral choices, commandments, religious rules, being rational, kindness, fairness, the Golden Rule.
Intentions: What do we

want pupils to learn?

Implementation: what kind of activities will enable learners to

achieve?

Impact: what outcomes will

pupils achieve?

Year 4

Unit Number 4.3 Theme

Religion, worldviews, beliefs, values and moral choices

 

Enquiry Questions Worship, pilgrimage, belonging and community: What matters most to Hindus and to Christians?

 

Religions / worldviews: Hindus, Christians

Knowledge:

§  Pupils will learn facts about Hindu and Christian examples of pilgrimages

§  They will be taught about at least two examples of the ways Hindus and Christians worship in Mandir and Church.

Skills:

They will think reasonably about questions of beliefs, worship, pilgrimage and community.

·         What does the journey of life mean to us? Talk about changes in their own lives and their hopes and expectations for the future. Using an example of a growing tree, record where pupils are now and what their hopes and dreams might be – branches? Leaves? Flowers? Fruits? Seeds?’

·         Learn about Hindu pilgrimages and Christian pilgrimages in depth and detail: Varanasi, the ‘Holy Land and other examples should be studied carefully.

·         Learn about Hindu worship and Christian worship, e.g. in the Aarti Ceremony at a mandir and the use of the Lord’s Prayer in Christian worship. Other examples could be studied.

·         What do Hindus believe about God and the journey(s) of life? Using a bag with several different Hindu Murtis (statues of gods), encourage the children to initially explore what they can feel without looking, and then remove the statues to examine them in detail. Research the meanings and uses of the murtis. Use the clips from ‘My Life My Religion: Hindus’ (BBC) to explore the many gods and goddesses worshipped in the Hindu tradition. Use the clip about the cycle of life (samsara) to explore the ‘journey’ metaphor (build on work from Y4a).

·         How do Christian communities, on occasions like baptism, weddings and funerals as well as in regular worship, use and enjoy music to express their beliefs about God and about the steps on the journey of life? Look at a wedding, baptism or first communion and consider how this important in the journey of life for some.

·         Is death the end? What do you believe and how does this affect the way you live your life? Ask children to reflect on their own, or in a pair/ small discussion group as appropriate. What do they believe about death? How does their belief affect the way they choose to live? Where have they obtained their ideas about these beliefs? NB – Sensitivity will clearly be needed throughout the teaching about death as children will have many and varied experiences of death in their own family contexts.

·         My journey through life: how is it going? Ask pupils to create a ‘journey bag’ for either a Christian or a Hindu. In the bag must be props that relate to what the pupils have learnt about the journey of

life and death for the chosen religion. They consider their own ideas as well.

Most pupils can:

·         Identify some practices of worship and pilgrimage which matter to Hindus and to Christians (A2).

·         Describe what Hindus and Christians experience when they go on a pilgrimage and when they worship (A2).

·         Suggest ideas about why Hindus and Christians find pilgrimage and worship valuable, making links with beliefs and spiritual ideas (B3).

·         Suggest reasons why worship and pilgrimage are challenging, but popular aspects of religious practice, offering different points of view (B2).

·         Give examples of similarities and differences between Hindu and Christian worship and pilgrimage (B3).

·         Apply ideas about the significance of worship and pilgrimage for themselves in the light of their learning (C2).

·         Express their own ideas about spiritual journeys in a creative way, drawing on the ideas of others they have studied (C3).

Key concepts and words Pilgrim, spiritual journey, Varanasi, Kumbh Mela, Jerusalem, the ‘Holy Land’, worship, Aarti ceremony, the Lord’s Prayer.
Intentions: What do we

want pupils to learn?

Implementation: what kind of activities will enable learners to achieve? Impact: what outcomes will

pupils achieve?

Year 5

Unit Number 5.1 Theme

Religion, beliefs and sources of wisdom and authority

 

Enquiry Questions How do

Christians use the Bible?

 

Religions: Christianity

Knowledge:

§   Pupils will learn about different ways in which the Bible has an impact on Christian living, considering stories, wisdom, advice and rules from the Bible in detail

§   They be taught about at least two examples of how the Bible has had an impact on people’s lives individually and in community or society

Pupils:

·         Talk about sources of guidance and wisdom in their own and others’ lives: who or what helps them to decide how to live? Introduce the Bible as a guide for Christians.

·         Give pupils a brief introduction to the Christian Bible – Old and New Testaments, divided into books, chapters and verses; different types of writing (illustrate with two examples e.g. histories; laws; poems; prayers; biographies (Gospels); letters) (be clear that what Christians call the ‘Old Testament’ is Jewish scripture too).

·         Introduce pupils to the idea that for Christians, the Bible is the basis of Christian teachings, part of the ‘organised worldview’ of Christians. Not all Christians read the Bible, but in Christian teaching, the Bible tells them about what God is like. It also tells a ‘big story’ of God’s dealings with human beings: God loves humans and created a wonderful world for people (creation); humans disobey God and go their own way (‘the Fall’); God sends his Son, Jesus (incarnation) to save people – to bring them back to God (salvation). This story explains why Christians think they need to say sorry to God, why they try to follow Jesus, and why they are grateful to God for sending Jesus. It shows why Christians think the Bible is still important because it tells them about how to live, and why they should follow God.

·         Creation: Read Genesis 1 (use a lively children’s version). Ask pupils to create dance/movement actions for each day, or artworks to reflect the narrative; focus on what the narrative shows God is like – powerful, creative, good etc.

·         Find out what good and bad things people sometimes do. Explore idea of temptation: what things are tempting? Why do we give in sometimes? Do we sometimes blame others? Tell the story of Adam and Eve giving in to temptation (Genesis 3 – often called ‘the Fall’). Does the way the people behave sound familiar? What lessons do pupils think Christians might learn from this story? Christian teaching says that people all choose to go against God’s commands. Think about why Christians say people need to ask God to forgive them.

·         Explore creatively the Lost Coin, Sheep and Son stories (Luke 15), building on prior learning, and how Christians interpret them as showing how much God wants ‘sinners’ to turn back to him; ask some Christians what they mean when they say Jesus saves or rescues them.

·         Look at examples of how some Christians use the Bible – for everyday prayer and Bible reading (often using notes), in Bible study groups; read aloud in church, with people talking about the meaning. What are the good things, and the difficult things Christians might find from trying to follow

this book in day-to-day life?

Most pupils can:

·         Describe some ways Christians say God is like, with examples from the Bible, using different forms of expression (A1).

·         Make connections between stories in the Bible and what Christians believe about creation, the Fall and salvation (A2).

·         Recall and name some Bible stories that inspire Christians (A2).

·         Explain how the Bible uses different kinds of stories to tell a big story (A2).

·         Identify at least two ways Christians use the Bible in everyday life (B1).

·         Give examples of how and suggest reasons why Christians use the Bible today (B1).

·         Suggest why Christians believe that God needs to rescue/save human beings (B2).

·         Discuss their own and others’ ideas about why humans do bad things and how people try to put things right (C3).

Skills:

They will think reasonably about questions of sources of wisdom and authority and weigh up big ideas from the bible for themselves

Key concepts and words Bible, Gospel, New Testament, authority, wisdom, creation, fall, redemption.
Intentions: What do we

want pupils to learn?

Implementation: what kind of activities will enable learners to achieve? Impact: what outcomes will

pupils achieve?

Year 5

 

Unit Number 5.2 Theme

Religion, family, community, worship, celebration, ways of living

 

Enquiry Question How do Muslims practice the 5 Pillars of Islam?

 

Religion: Islam

Knowledge:

§  Pupils will gain knowledge about Muslim worship and celebration, including detailed information about each of the 5 Pillars

§  They will learn about Muslim worship, ritual and devotion at home and at the mosque, examining beliefs and values expressed in stories, festivities and worship and learning from community life.

§   Is life like a journey? Do we need a guide? Ask pupils to reflect on the idea of life as a journey and to think of questions that this idea raises, such as where they will get the things they need? What happens afterwards? How do we know which way to go? Who travels with us?

§   Introduce the five pillars of Islam as essentials in the life of a Muslim. The five pillars of Islam provide a structure for Islamic daily spiritual life. Islam is like a house held up by five strong pillars with central themes of living a good life and sharing with others.

§   Belief: First Pillar of Islam. Teach children about the ‘Shahadah’ which is fundamental to the Islamic religion and is their declaration of faith:- “There is no God except Allah, Muhammad is the prophet of Allah” (The 1st pillar of the 5 pillars of Islam). It’s a belief to shout and whisper: teach the children that this belief is whispered to newborn babies by their fathers, and is shouted from minarets to call Muslims to prayer 5 times daily. Play the pupils the call to the prayer from a Mosque, e.g. at http://www.islamcan.com/audio/adhan/index.shtml

§   ‘Peace be upon him’ is said after every mention of Muhammad (pbuh). Teach children about the Islamic greeting ‘As-Salamu-Alaykum’ (Peace be upon you). Muslims say this to whoever they pray next to, at the end of every prayer. Share the story of Bilal, the first Muezzin, who proclaimed his belief in God even when his slave-master threatened his life! Belief in God and His Prophet matters very much in Islam.

§   Prayer: Second Pillar of Islam Watch a video clip showing Muslims performing salah, with the sound down. Ask pupils to look carefully at the prayer movements. The Muslim website www.jannah.com/learn/flashprayer1.html contains a useful downloadable presentation called ‘Prophet Muhammad’s manner of doing prayers’. Can pupils write a commentary to the video, explaining what the soundtrack would say?

§   Ask pupils to consider in groups: Why do people pray? How do you think it might make them feel? Does God hear and answer people’s prayers? Is it good to pray alone? In a group? Use clips from BBC ‘My Life My Religion: Islam’ http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p02mwkxn

§   Charity: ‘Zakah’ the Third Pillar of Islam. Research Muslim charity or almsgiving – Zakah, and the ways in which Muslims help and care for the worldwide Muslim community (Ummah). Discuss why and how is Zakah performed and who benefits. Consider the importance of generosity in pupils’ own lives: who is generous to you, and to whom

are you generous? Why, and how does this make a difference?

Most pupils will be able to:

·         A1. Describe and make connections between different features of the Muslim religion discovering more about the Five Pillars in order to reflect thoughtfully on their ideas;

·         A2. Describe and understand links between stories of the Prophets and the 5 Pillars, responding thoughtfully to beliefs and practices of Islam

·         B1. Observe and understand varied examples of Islamic practice so that they can explain, with reasons, their meanings and significance to Muslims in our community;

·         B2 Understand the challenges of commitment to a community of faith or belief expressed in keeping the 5 Pillars

·         C1. Discuss and present thoughtfully their own and others’ views on challenging questions about what the 5 Pillars teach regarding belonging and meaning in life;

·         C2. Consider and apply ideas about ways in which Muslim communities can live together with others for the well being of all in the UK;

Skills:

Discussion, gathering information from video, story, visual resources and where possible interviews or visits, inferring and suggesting meanings to religious practices.

Key concepts and words Religion, spiritual, commitment, values, prayer, pilgrim, pilgrimage, ritual, symbol, community, worship, devotion, belief, life after death, destiny, soul, inspiration, role-model
Muslim, Islam, Allah, Prophet, mosque, Qur’an, moon and star, paradise. §   Find out about an Islamic charity like Islamic Relief, which has section on its website for pupils: http://www.islamic-relief.com/hilal/index.htm Tell a story of the prophet and money and use this saying from the Qur’an to explore attitudes. “They ask you (O Muhammad) what they should spend in charity. Say: ‘Whatever you spend with a good heart, give it to parents, relatives, orphans, the helpless, and travellers in need. Whatever good you do, God is aware of it.'” – The Holy Quran, 2:215 Why is charity important? How can people do more to help others?

§   Fasting: ‘Sawm’ the Fourth Pillar of Islam Share information with pupils about fasting in Islam. The main period of fasting happens during the month of Ramadan. Fasting helps Muslims to appreciate how poor people suffer. It also concentrates the mind on what it means to be a Muslim and obey the command of Allah. It helps to build discipline into the life of a Muslim. How does the class think fasting helps Muslims understand other people? Share information on the festival of Eid-ul-Fitr which happens at the end of Ramadan. It is a day of celebration, happiness and forgiveness.

§   Pilgrimage to Makkah: ‘Hajj’- Fifth Pillar of Islam. Discuss the places in the world that pupils would most like to visit. Are some for inspiration? Use websites, videos or illustrations from books to show the different parts of the pilgrimage to Makkah – get pupils to think about how, who, where, when, why and what if questions to do with the Hajj, perhaps writing them around the edges of some riveting photos.. Give information so that pupils can answer some of their own questions.

§   Summarise pupils learning, reviewing what each of the Pillars contributes to Muslim belief, faith and devotion. Which Pillar is most important? Hardest to keep? Valuable for children? Comforting?

Challenging?

Intentions: What do we want

pupils to learn?

Implementation: what kind of activities will enable learners to achieve? Impact: what outcomes

will pupils achieve?

Year 5

 

Unit Number 5.3 Theme

Religion, family, community, worship, celebration, ways of living

 

Enquiry Question Why are there now more than 200 mosques in Yorkshire?

 

Religion: Islam

Knowledge:

§  Pupils will gain knowledge about Muslim worship and community life including detailed information about the life and practice of a mosque

§  They will learn about Muslim worship, ritual and devotion at home and at the mosque, examining beliefs and values expressed in stories, festivities and worship and learning from community life.

Pupils will learn about the mosque: a place of submission and community.

§   Teach pupils that the first mosque in Britain opened in Worthing over 130 years ago in 1889. Ask them to guess how many Mosques there are in the UK today. There are over 2100, serving a Muslim population of over 2 million – less than one mosque per thousand Muslim people. Over 200 of these Mosques are in Yorkshire (NB: there are about 50 000 Christian congregations in the UK, for comparison)

§   Origins of mosques: Tell the story of the freed slave, Bilal, who was the first Muezzin (prayer caller) of Islam.

§   Visit – or take a virtual tour of – a Mosque, explaining that this is a special place for Muslims. See guidance on visits above.

§   The community and the mosque: consider why mosques function as community centres, e.g. for older people, for education, for a food bank, as a place of peace.

§   Case study: a mosque in Britain has submitted an application to the town council to sound the call to prayer five times a day. Debate in the class how such an application should be handled.

§   Teach pupils about how Muslims pray 5 times each day, facing Makkah, and bowing to God, then wishing peace and blessings to those with whom they pray. The prayer mat is a clean place from which to pray – it is like a mosque. Standing on the mat makes a special or holy place for Muslims. Ask pupils: what is the body language saying, as the Muslim person prays?

§   Give pupils varied explanations of why the number of mosques has grown a lot in the last 50 years – religious, spiritual sociological, demographic or geographical explanations could be used. Note that this seems hard, but pupil can make a choice between different ideas!

§   Here are 8 possible answers, or part answers to the question:

A.       Every religion has a holy building of its own, and Muslims like to build their own buildings.

B.       Muslim people have moved to Yorkshire from all over the world in the last 50 years.

C.       The Prophet Muhammad built mosques wherever he went, so Muslim followers today do the same, wherever they go. It is about following the Prophet’s example.

D.       There are thousands of British Muslims in Yorkshire- born and bred in this country.

E.       Any community likes to have a place to meet and share their life.

F.       Praying together is easier than praying on your own.

G.      If you are a small or minority community, religion is a way of ‘sticking together’

H.       The mosque is a symbol of Muslim identity and belonging.

Most pupils will be able to:

·         A1. Describe and make connections between different features of the Mosque as a place to pray;

·         A2. Describe and understand links between what happens at a mosque and Muslim belief and history in the UK.

·         B1. Observe and understand varied examples of Islamic practice so that they can explain, with reasons, their meanings and significance to Muslims in our community;

·         B2 Understand the challenges of commitment to being a member of a Mosque

·         C1. Discuss and present thoughtfully their own and others’ views on challenging questions about why there are over 200 mosques in Yorkshire;

·         C2. Consider and apply ideas about ways in which Muslim communities can live together with others for the well being of all in the UK;

Skills:

Discussion, gathering information from video, story, visual resources and where possible interviews or visits, inferring and suggesting meanings to religious practices.

Key concepts and words Religion, spiritual, commitment, Mosque, migration, prayer, ritual, symbol, community, worship, devotion, belief, Muslim, Islam, Allah, Prophet, Qur’an, moon and star, paradise.

Year 6 Programme of Study

Intentions: What do we

want pupils to learn?

Implementation: what kind of activities will enable learners to

achieve?

Impact: what outcomes will

pupils achieve?

Year 6

Unit Number 6.1 Theme

Religion, worldviews, family and community:

 

Enquiry Questions Christians Aid and Islamic Relief: can they change the world?

 

Religions: Christianity, Islam, Also non-religious examples of global development charity could be studied in this unit.

Knowledge:

§  Pupils will gain a rich knowledge of the work of two faith based charities

§  They will be taught about the ways in which the charities express the religious beliefs in justice, compassion and community.

Skills:

They will think reasonably about questions of global poverty, justice and community. They will be asked to analyse how beliefs have an impact in action. They will be asked to apply values of fairness, justice and ‘changing the world’ for themselves.

·         Think about some of the ways in which the world is not such a good place: you could start small and local, and end up big and global, e.g. from upsetting people in the dinner queue through to messing up the environment. Talk about why people are not always as good as they could be. Recall that Christians believe God helps them through the Holy Spirit. Muslims also believe people do good and bad deeds and need God’s mercy.

·         Compare the work of Christian Aid and Islamic Relief: can they change the world? (Other development charities could be studied: Khalsa Aid is a Sikh charity and Sewa International is a Hindu char- ity). Set pupils ‘web quest’ tasks to find out about what the two charities do for those in most need. Who started the charities and how are they changing thew world today?

·         Religions suggest that people need help and guidance to live in the right way. Explore teachings which act as guides for living within two religious traditions studied during the year, and a non-religious belief system, e.g. the Ten Commandments (Exodus 20:1–21, Deu- teronomy 5:1–22), the Two Commandments of Jesus (Mark 12:28–

34) and the ‘Golden Rule’ (Matthew 7:12). Note that the Golden Rule is important in many traditions, including for Humanists. Work out what people must have been doing if they needed to be given those rules. Do people still behave like that? What difference would it make if people keep these guides for living? How would it make the world a better place?

·         Explore the Muslim belief in charity (zakah): find out what it is and how Muslims give charity. Use some examples of charities such as www.Islamic-Relief.org.uk or www.muslimhands.org.uk and find out how and why they help to make the world a better place.

·         Explore the lives of inspirational Christians (e.g. Desmond Tutu, Martin Luther King Jr, Mother Teresa, etc.). Consider how their reli- gious faith inspired and guided them in their lives, and their contri- butions to making the world a better place.

·         Look at the work of a secular charity such as Oxfam. How have they made the world a better place?

·         Enable pupils to reflect on the values of love, forgiveness, honesty, kindness, generosity and service in their own lives and the lives of others, in the light of their studies in RE. How can these values be-

come stronger in our lives and in the world?

Most pupils will:

·         identify some beliefs about why the world is not always a good place and how faith can make a difference

·         make links between religious beliefs and teachings and why people try to make the world a better place

·         make simple links between teachings about how to live and ways in which people try to make the world a better place

·         describe examples of how charities make the world a better place

·         make links between some commands for living for the good of all from religious tra- ditions, non-religious worldviews and pupils’ own ideas

·         express their own ideas about the best ways to make the world a better place, making links with religious ideas studied, giving good reasons for their views

Key concepts and words Religion, charity, compassion, justice, fairness, aid and development, liberation, global change
Intentions: What do we

want pupils to learn?

Implementation: what kind of activities will enable learners to

achieve?

Impact: what outcomes

will pupils achieve?

Year 6

Unit Number 6.2 Theme

Religion, worldviews, family and community:

 

Enquiry Questions Who is inspiring to Muslims and to Christians?

 

Religions: Christianity, Islam

Knowledge:

§  Pupils will learn about examples of Muslims and Christians who might be inspirational followers of their faith and consider how and why they are inspiring.

§  They will be taught about at least two examples from each religion and consider connections to the origins and scriptures of the faith.

Skills:

They will think reasonably about questions of inspiration, living the human life for others and virtues in different religions.

In this unit plan, we suggest pupils spend six or more lessons learning

about people who might be inspiring. We have not chosen religious found- ers or people from many centuries past here. These examples are specific, but other ‘great lives’ could be studied too.

Inspiring people: what does it mean? And what does it mean in religion? And who is a non-religious inspiring person?

·         Pupils consider and ask questions about what makes a person inspira- tional to others, identifying characteristics of a good role model. We are sometimes inspired by people who are good at one thing – sport, music or cookery, for example. But others are inspiring because they are good in a human and humane sense. Make some lists and distin- guish these kinds of inspiration.

·         This unit gives pupils a chance to hear stories of inspiring people from different religions. Teachers might use these examples:

·         Muslim religion: Malala Yousafzai is an Islamic campaigner for girls’ ed- ucation and equality. Despite being shot by sexist troops, she went on to become the youngest-ever Nobel Peace Prize winner, and a movie of her life won many prizes.

·         Dr Hany El Banna, from the West Midlands, is the founder of the huge Muslim charity Islamic Relief. His story shows Qur’anic values and teaching in action.

·         Christian religion: Revd Dr Martin Luther King Jr, a civil rights cam- paigner in 1950s USA who was shot dead aged 39 after a lifelong struggle against racism.

·         Hi Holiness Pope Francis has inspired many Catholic Christians and others with his teaching emphasising love, inclusion and the values of the Gospel of Christ.

Exploring inspiration: four keys

·         As pupils study the actions and words of an inspiring person (and it could be someone local instead of the examples given – John Bunyan maybe?), make sure they link the life story into the beliefs and values of the religion. Four key ways to do this can be seen in these four questions:

1      Did this person follow the teaching of their scriptures? How? Give three or more examples.

2      Does this person encourage others to follow God in their religion? How? Give three examples.

3      What difference did this person make to others? Is there a move- ment inspired by their life? What is their ‘legacy’?

4      Did this person sum up their vision in some famous sayings or memorable quotes? What do you think of them?

Most pupils can:

·         Explain the impact of beliefs from religion on the lives of inspiring people from different religions.

·         Connect up beliefs about God, justice and humanity with the work of these inspiring leaders linked to teaching from religious sacred texts

·         Consider varied answers to questions about what makes a person an inspiration to others

·         Explain thoughtfully their own ideas about inspiration to live our best lives.

·         Apply the ideas of inspiration and changing the world for themselves

·         Explain what matters about peace, respect and harmony to themselves and in our community.

Key concepts and words Religion, inspiration, submission to Allah, following Jesus, respect, moral values, spirituality, changing the world for the better.
Investigations and enquiries: can the class work in small research teams?

·         The class might work on group presentations in teams of four or five to investigate one person from religion who is inspiring. Can they retell that person’s life story, or some key incidents from it? Can they give several reasons and examples of what makes this person inspirational? Can they use religious vocabulary to describe aspects of lives and teachings of inspiring leaders and inspirational people? Can they make links and identify similarities and differences between the different peo- ple studied? Can they accept that no one is perfect, and that these he- roes (to some) may also have a ‘downside’ to their lives?

·         These studies may have a personal impact. Can pupils working alone explain the qualities they admire in their heroes/role models? Can they say why they admire them and how this may influence their own lives? Can they respond to questions raised by the stories from the lives of key religious figures and contemporary followers? Can they make links between what they have learnt about inspirational people and their

own behaviour?

Intentions: What do we

want pupils to learn?

Implementation: what kind of activities will enable learners

to achieve?

Impact: what outcomes will pupils

achieve?

Year 6

Unit Number 6.3 Theme

Religion, worldviews, family and community:

 

Enquiry Questions What will make Rotherham a more respectful place?

 

What contributions do religions make to local life in Rotherham?

 

Religions: Select from Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Judaism.

Also non-religious examples should be studied in this unit.

Knowledge:

§  Pupils will learn statistics of world religions in the local area, the county, region, nation and world.

§  They will be taught about at least two examples of inter faith co-operation.

Skills:

They will think reasonably about questions of community harmony and inter faith work.

 

Key concepts and words Religion, inter-faith, harmony, tolerance, respect, moral values, religious plurality

Pupils:

·         investigate aspects of community life such as weekly worship, charitable giving or beliefs about prayer, showing their understanding and expressing ideas of their own (A2)

·         linking to the expressive arts, pupils develop their own imaginative and creative ways of expressing some of their own commitments such as working hard at sport or music, caring for animals, loving the family or serving God (B2)

·         list and describe similarities and differences between the ways different communities show that they belong (C1)

·         linking to Mathematics and Geography, pupils use local and national census statistics to develop accurate understanding of the religious plurality of their locality, region and of Britain today (C2)

·         discuss and apply ideas from different religious codes for living (e.g. Commandments, Precepts or Rules), to compile a charter of their own moral values, applying their ideas to issues of respect for all (C2)

·         apply ideas such as tolerance, empathy and respect for all to real-life examples of tension or conflict between different groups: how can our society become more respectful? What do inter faith events do to make respect grow?

·         clearly express their own ideas about a more respectful community

·         write a speech for someone who wants to be the mayor of Rotherham explaining how they will make

our communities more harmonious. Can they suggest 6 ideas and explain what impact they would have?

Most pupils can:

·         Explain the impact of beliefs about communities on people from different religions.

·         Connect at least two viewpoints about whether our communities can be more harmonious to teaching from religious sacred texts

·         Consider varied answers to questions about building peaceful families and communities

·         Explain thoughtfully their own ideas about communities – why they matter, and how they can become stronger.

·         Apply the ideas of tolerance and respect to some tensions or problems in community relations

·         Explain what matters about peace, respect and harmony to themselves and in our community.

RE units of work overview

Information Comming soon!